Tishah B’av: Fast for the Destruction of the Temples

One of the gates of the city of Jerusalem, pock marked by mortar shells.

One of the gates of the city of Jerusalem, pock marked by mortar shells.

Tishah B’av is a day of communal mourning for Isra’el as it commemorates the destruction of the first and second temples in Jerusalem, and may also include other events which have left the Jewish nation scarred. Tishah appears to have multiple spellings, depending on where you look. I have found three.

During the day, the book of Lamentations is read, accompanied by a traditional song only used on this day. “Traditional Jews do not eat meat, cut their hair, or wash their clothes unless they are to be worn again during the nine days. All these actions are considered signs of joy or luxury inappropriate for this time of mourning. Reform, Reconstructionist, and Conservative Jews adopt a varied range of these practices.” Source link. They are also encouraged to visit cemeteries to heighten the mourning.

“The meal ending the fast traditionally omits meat and wine, in acknowledgment of the fact that the burning of the Temple continued until the next day. Finally, the sorrow that began on the 17th of Tammuz comes to a halt and the Shabbat immediately following Tishah B’Av is called Shabbat Nahamu (Shabbat of comfort) because the Haftarah begins with the words “nahamu nahamu ami” (“comfort, comfort my people”). This begins a period of consolation and comfort leading up to Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year.” For more information, please read the page these quotes come from. The dating and practices around Tishah B’Av get complex. (Page link.)

Other related articles:

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All copyright and ownership of the text and logo images for the quoted websites belong to them. However, while some images are made by me, Creative Commons or Public Domain, many are purchased stock photos. It is ILLEGAL for you to take and use them, whether for yourself, commercially or for a non-profit venture such as a church or Bible Study. If you have not bought these photos from the source, the stock photography company has every right to sue you. If you need to check the origin of an image, please use the free service at Tineye.com

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Got Torah? Celebrating Shavuot 2019

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“Shavuot, which means “Festival of Weeks,” is just one name for the holiday. It also goes by Harvest Festival (Chag HaKatzir), Day of the First Fruits (Yom Habikurim), The Stoppage/Restrain (Atzeret – a reference the sages use to highlight the prohibition against work on this day), and Time of the Giving of the Torah (Z’man Matan Torah).”

It is celebrated 50 days after the second day of Passover (Pesach) and it “commemorates the day when the Israelites received the Torah during their desert wanderings. The rabbis say that Passover and Shavuot are really one holiday – the Exodus from Egypt was only complete with the giving of the Torah.”

Source: Israel21c.org Fun Facts About Shavuot in Isra’el. It’s an interesting article and well worth reading.


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All copyright and ownership of the text and logo images for the quoted websites belong to them. However, while some images are made by me, Creative Commons or Public Domain, many are purchased stock photos. It is ILLEGAL for you to take and use them, whether for yourself, commercially or for a non-profit venture such as a church or Bible Study. If you have not bought these photos from the source, the stock photography company has every right to sue you. If you need to check the origin of an image, please use the free service at Tineye.com

Postcards for Survivors: Reach Out & Give ~ #HMD2019

Holocaust Memorial Logo“Holocaust Memorial Day 2019 marks the 40th anniversary of the end of the Genocide in Cambodia.” It also remembers “the six million Jews murdered during the Holocaust, the millions of people killed under Nazi Persecution and in subsequent genocides in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Darfur.

The theme for HMD 2019: Torn from home encourages audiences to reflect on how the enforced loss of a safe place to call ‘home’ is part of the trauma faced by anyone experiencing persecution and genocide. ‘Home’ usually means a place of safety, comfort and security. On HMD 2019 we will reflect on what happens when individuals, families and communities are driven out of, or wrenched from their homes, because of persecution or the threat of genocide, alongside the continuing difficulties survivors face as they try to find and build new homes when the genocide is over.”

Please read more here or you can participate in the Postcard Project as an individual and write to Renee or Sokphal, who were forced to flee their homes in the Nazi genocide and the Cambodian genocide. The postcards are available to print yourself from this link. They will be posted back to the organisation which is in the United Kingdom.

About Renee image

About Sokphal image

 


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To communicate this initiative properly I have taken the text and images directly from the HMD.org website. All copyright and ownership of the text and images belongs to them. Check their website for social media links and please spread the word about the day.

The New Year for Trees and Their Significance: Tu B’shevat 2019

treeThroughout 2019, posts will come out that celebrate Jewish and Israeli special days. Today is “Tu B’Shevat, the day that marks the beginning of a “new year” for trees. This is the season in which the earliest-blooming trees in the Land of Israel emerge from their winter sleep, and begin a new fruit-bearing cycle.

Trees play a significant role in the Jewish Bible / Old Testament. Pomegranates have always been related to God’s people multiplying, thriving and be successful and another strong example is the fig tree.

  • Micah 4:4 “Everyone will sit under their own vine and under their own fig tree, and no one will make them afraid, for the LORD Almighty has spoken.”
  • Joel 1:12 “The grapevines have dried up, and the fig trees have withered. The pomegranate trees, palm trees, and apple trees–all the fruit trees–have dried up. And the people’s joy has dried up with them.”

Botannically, the fig tree is a keystone species and is eaten by over 1200 kinds of animals and is also thought to have been a critical food source for people. So as the fig tree flourishes, or dies back, so does the prosperity and safety of God’s people, Isra’el.

Another beautiful example of how in God’s Word, trees are symbols of peace with the Lord, times of rest and prosperity, comes from Isaiah:

“You will go out in joy
and be led forth in peace;
the mountains and hills
will burst into song before you,
and all the trees of the field
will clap their hands.
Instead of the thornbush will grow the juniper,
and instead of briers the myrtle will grow.
This will be for the Lord’s renown,
for an everlasting sign,
that will endure forever.”
Isaiah 55:12-13

eating watermelonHistorically, the “new year” for trees related to the various tithes (offerings or in some cases, taxes) that were separated from produce grown in the Holy Land. These tithes differed from year to year, in the seven-year shemittah cycle. The point at which a budding fruit is considered to belong to the next year of the cycle is the 15th of Shevat.

Jewish people mark the day of Tu B’Shevat by eating fruit, particularly from the kinds that are singled out by the Torah in its praise of the bounty of the Holy Land: grapes, figs, pomegranates, olives and dates. On this day people remember that “man is a tree of the field” (Deuteronomy 20:19), and reflect on the lessons we can derive from our botanical analogue.”

Historical Information Source: http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/3264/jewish/Tu-BShevat.htm


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All copyright and ownership of the text and logo images for any quoted websites belong to them. However, while some images are made by me, Creative Commons or Public Domain, many are purchased stock photos. It is ILLEGAL for you to take and use them, whether for yourself, commercially or for a non-profit venture such as a church or Bible Study. If you have not bought these photos from the source, the stock photography company has every right to sue you. If you need to check the origin of an image, please use the free service at Tineye.com

Poetry Month: The Poetic Structure of the Psalms

adf592fa-b632-459a-93dd-24b3a13f85aaI’ve recently begun to learn about the structural nature of the Psalms and how complex it can get! David sure didn’t just dash down whatever came to mind, he often used complex poetic structures which were traditional for his part of the world, some of which can also be seen in Ugaritic poetry.

I found a set of articles on Bible Gateway which are helpful and serve as a basic introduction to the structure of the Psalms. More information will be available online. You can read the full articles I refer to here: https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/asbury-bible-commentary/Hebrew-Poetry

This is a technical area which I struggle to get my head around at times, and to be honest, I do wonder if the structure of the Psalms is being over-analysed; but if nothing else, it’s lovely to be able to appreciate how much skill was involved in writing these beautiful poetic songs.
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Features of the Psalms:

1. Acrostic: (each verse starts with a letter of the alphabet in order “A to Z,” (aleph to tau.)

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2. Parallelism: (various forms) which creates balanced repetition.

The earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it,
the world, and all who live in it;
for he founded it upon the seas
and established it upon the waters. Psalm 24:1-2

There are several forms of parallelism: synonymous, contrasting, comparative, incomplete (which is why I wonder whether or not we are simply over-analysing, thanks to critical schools of theological thought,) and formal. Please read this excellent article on parallelism which explains it simply.

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3. Alliteration: using words which have similar sounds.

From Bible Gateway: “Assonance is the use of a series of words with the same or similar internal sounds (versus the initial sounds). The “r” (resh) line, v. 19, of the acrostic in Psalm 34 ombines these three devices (acrostic, alliteration, assonance): rabbôṯ rā’ôṯ ṩaddîq, “A righteous man may have many troubles. . . .”

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4. Chiasm: “arranges elements in an “x” or inverted pattern: abc//c’b’a’.”

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5. Inclusio: beginning and ending a section, or whole Psalm, with identical or nearly identical words.

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6. Numerical Progression, such as Psalm 62 where numbers used in the text count upwards.

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7. Repetition/Refrain: repetition is used to mark out units in the Psalm, e.g. Psalm 42:5, 11 and 43:5. These Psalms appear to be a set in actuality, not two separate Psalms, despite how they are separated in modern Bibles.

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istock_000009732076xsmall8. Rhyme can be used, and (in Hebrew) is found in Psalm 23:2.

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9. Meter: according to Bible Gateway, “Hebraists (Hebrew scholars) recognise that classical Hebrew poetry probably had some system of meter. What that system was remains hotly contested for lack of clear evidence, with some scholars actually denying that Hebrew poetry contains such a system. Some conclude that line length, perhaps counted in syllables, was the basis of Hebrew “metrics.” Others think Hebrew meter was counted in word or word-group units (“feet”), with some corresponding balance in line length naturally arising as a result. Whether an actual system of accent or stress was involved we do not know.

The law of—the Lord—is perfect, reviving—the soul.    (3 + 2)
The ordinances of—the Lord—are sure and righteous—altogether.   (3 + 2)
They are more precious—than gold, than pure gold—much;   (2 + 2)
they are sweeter—than honey, than honey from—the comb.   (2 + 2)
Your servant—is warned—by them; in keeping them—is reward—great.    (3 + 3)

Whether or not such designations correspond to the ancients’ understandings of their art, they serve well to indicate the relative length of lines whose balance in length (and with it one might surmise some sort of rhythm) and use of length for artistic and rhetorical purposes can scarcely have been accidental.”

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For more information on National Poetry Month, visit poets.org

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Please note that this does NOT apply to any of the images on this site except for the free Psalm images which are marked as free. Most photos are purchased stock photos. It is ILLEGAL for you to take and use them, whether for yourself, commercially or for a non-profit venture such as a church or Bible Study. If you have not bought these photos from the source, the stock photography company has every right to sue you.

Celebrating Passover 2017

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For an explanation of what Passover it all about, please visit this post. Enjoy the Maccabeats, celebrating Passover in Les Misérables style.

For an explanation of what Passover it all about, please visit this post.