Bible Hub: Everything You Need to Study the Bible – #Free

bh2From the beginnings of this project I have needed multiple translations, commentaries, Hebrew wording and as many reference resources as I could get my hands on… it can get expensive… However, even amongst the reference materials I have purchased, many have not been as helpful as Bible Hub.

They have multi-lingual Bibles, reading plans, devotions, encyclopaedias and dictionaries… everything you could want and they don’t ask for payment. They don’t even have a donation box, which I would have used, as I am heavily dependent on the site.

Raid it, bookmark it and pray for a blessing on the people who are kind enough to run it!
“Bible Hub Online Parallel Bible, search and study tools including parallel texts, cross references, Treasury of Scripture, and commentaries. This site provides quick access to topical studies, interlinears, sermons, Strong’s and many more resources.

Our mission is best summarised as follows:
1) Increase the visibility and accessibility of the Scriptures online.
2) Provide free access to Bible study tools in many languages.
3) Promote the Gospel of Christ through the learning, study and application of God’s word.

This site is a great way to link any verse on your site to an instant menu of 25 versions!”
REBLOGS WELCOMED


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All copyright and ownership of the text and logo images for any quoted websites belong to them. However, while some images are made by me, Creative Commons or Public Domain, many are purchased stock photos. It is ILLEGAL for you to take and use them, whether for yourself, commercially or for a non-profit venture such as a church or Bible Study. If you have not bought these photos from the source, the stock photography company has every right to sue you. If you need to check the origin of an image, please use the free service at Tineye.com

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Bible Geek: Names and Keeping the Bible Real

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We easily become complacent about the familiar. When I was writing my first Christian novel, The Dragon Tree, I decided to use the Hebrew names of the people in the Bible who I was portraying. It was a device to snap readers out of their preconceived views of those figures and place them into a new mindset; but it was also done as a sign of respect. I hate seeing beloved people regarded as “characters.” They become fictional. We can lose sight of the humanity of those in the Word, and this can lead to ungodly behaviour, such as excessive judgement about their life events.

Consider this, when you enter Heaven, what name would you like to be called by? I would like to be known as Cate, because that is my name. Over times names morph as culture and pronunciation changes, but I would still like my name to sound like it is now, the way I know it. For that reason, I dug around to find out what King David’s name would have sounded like and would be written as. In my head, I use that, not King David.

I sometimes write his name as Daviyd. It is not the only version though. In Yiddish, or as used by the Ashkenazi Jews (who are part of my lineage), his name is Dovid, some call him Dawid. In parts of the Middle East, the slang word for David is Daud. Dod or dowd, appears to the the root of the word, David. What does it mean? According to the Strongs Concordance of Hebrew words, it may mean beloved. As the youngest son of Jesse, that would be apt. [Strongs reference 1732]
David
As for the word king, this caused me a great deal of confusion. Not all words are clear to me and there are many reference sources. I had to standardise and just use Strongs. The term most used by the Rabbis is Melek [Strongs reference 4430]. It is pronounced as it sounds. Remember, that Hebrew is read from right to left, so King David is actually Daviyd Melek.

The other name which indicates the greatest respect is Hashem, which means “the Name.” You may be aware that Jews will not use the word God, Yahweh, and some won’t use Adonai (Lord.) This quote from eliyah.com explains why. “This is four Hebrew letters (Yod, He, Waw and He) called the “Tetragrammaton”. The four characters are the four Hebrew letters that correspond to YHWH and are transliterated IAUE or Yahweh. Yahweh is the name of the Almighty Father in Heaven that people commonly call “The LORD” or “God”. The reason we see “LORD” and “God” in our bibles is because of a Jewish tradition that the name Yahweh was not to be spoken, for fear that the name be blasphemed.”

In researching my Jewish heritage and studying David, I have watched a lot of Jewish television online and one day, I stumbled across a great video by Ari Goldwag, which was encouraging people to remember that Hashem (God) loves them, no matter what crisis points and stresses they hit in their day. It felt a little strange to see an “Hashem Loves You” sticker in the video, but the message was spot on!

LionOfJudah

Back in 2000, I had the joy of meeting a Messianic Rabbi and we were talking about the differences between my church and the Messianic congregations. I was telling him how I felt that some Christians had fallen into a vending machine form of Christianity. You put your offering and prayers in and the correct answer, just the way you want it, is expected to come out. There is a lack of respect for Who the Lord is; a lack of reverence and the fear of the Lord is often missing, and I include myself in that last one. We are very comfortable as Christians and while that is a good thing, it can be problematic. We take God for granted.

This is part of the reason why I love listening to the Rabbi’s point of view and reading my Messianic Bible. They say Hashem, they call David, Daviyd Melek and it pulls me up and makes me reconsider who I am thinking about, with respect. We need to use and love and speak the name of Jesus but we also need to remember WHO we are addressing and adjust our attitude from one of “do it my way,” to “Lord, YOUR will be done.”

Please see this page for more information. http://www.eliyah.com/names.html


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Creative Commons License
The King David Project by Cate Russell-Cole is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC BY-SA 4.0).
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://cateartios.wixsite.com/kingdavidproject.

Please note that this does NOT apply to any of the images on this site except for the free Psalm images which are marked as free. Most photos are purchased stock photos. It is ILLEGAL for you to take and use them, whether for yourself, commercially or for a non-profit venture such as a church or Bible Study. If you have not bought these photos from the source, the stock photography company has every right to sue you.

Hebrew for Christians: A Useful Reference

John J. Parsons has put this site together, which assists Christians in studying Biblical Hebrew and understanding the Jewishness of the Bible. If you want to understand David, this is exactly the kind of resource you need.

John has formally studied and been involved in a number of ministries. There is a wealth of awesome knowledge on this site which should interest you, including Torah readings, prayers, priestly blessings, Kaddish, Talmud, New Testament topics and more.

Please check it out and donate. A donation box is at the bottom of the “About HFC” page.

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REBLOGS WELCOMED

Respect: Remembering WHO I am Talking About

iStock_000019072460SmallWe easily become complacent about the familiar. When I was writing my first Christian novel, The Dragon Tree, I decided to use the Hebrew names of the people in the Bible who I was portraying. It was a device to snap readers out of their preconceived views of those figures and place them into a new mindset; but it was also done as a sign of respect. I hate seeing beloved people regarded as “characters.” They become fictional. We can lose sight of the humanity of those in the Word, and this can lead to ungodly behaviour, such as excessive judgement about their life events.

Consider this, when you enter Heaven, what name would you like to be called by? I would like to be known as Cate, because that is my name. Over times names morph as culture and pronunciation changes, but I would still like my name to sound like it is now, the way I know it. For that reason, I dug around to find out what King David’s name would have sounded like and would be written as. In my head, I use that, not King David.

I write his name as Daviyd. It is not the only version though. In Yiddish, or as used by the Ashkenazi Jews (who are part of my lineage), his name is Dovid, some call him Dawid. In parts of the Middle East, the slang word for David is Daud. Dod or dowd, appears to the the root of the word, David. What does it mean? According to the Strongs Concordance of Hebrew words, it may mean beloved. As the youngest son of Jesse, that would be apt. [Strongs reference 1732]

As for the word king, this caused me a great deal of confusion. Not all words are clear to me and there are many reference sources. I had to standardise and just use Strongs. The term most used by the Rabbis is Melek [Strongs reference 4430]. It is pronounced as it sounds. Remember, that Hebrew is read from right to left, so King David is actually Daviyd Melek.

The other name which indicates the greatest respect is Hashem, which means “the Name.” You may be aware that Jews will not use the word God, Yahweh, and some won’t use Adonai (Lord.) This quote from eliyah.com explains why. “This is four Hebrew letters (Yod, He, Waw and He) called the “Tetragrammaton”. The four characters are the four Hebrew letters that correspond to YHWH and are transliterated IAUE or Yahweh. Yahweh is the name of the Almighty Father in Heaven that people commonly call “The LORD” or “God”. The reason we see “LORD” and “God” in our bibles is because of a Jewish tradition that the name Yahweh was not to be spoken, for fear that the name be blasphemed.”

In researching my Jewish heritage and studying David, I have watched a lot of Jewish television online and one day, I stumbled across a great video by Ari Goldwag, which was encouraging people to remember that Hashem (God) loves them, no matter what crisis points and stresses they hit in their day. It felt a little strange to see an “Hashem Loves You” sticker in the video, but the message was spot on!

iStock_000003332321XSmallBack in 2000, I had the joy of meeting a Messianic Rabbi and we were talking about the differences between my church and the Messianic congregations. I was telling him how I felt that some Christians had fallen into a vending machine form of Christianity. You put your offering and prayers in and the correct answer, just the way you want it, is expected to come out. There is a lack of respect for Who the Lord is; a lack of reverence and the fear of the Lord is often missing, and I include myself in that last one. We are very comfortable as Christians and while that is a good thing, it can be problematic. We take God for granted.

This is part of the reason why I love listening to the Rabbi’s point of view and reading my Messianic Bible. They say Hashem, they call David, Daviyd Melek and it pulls me up and makes me reconsider who I am thinking about, with respect. We need to use and love and speak the name of Jesus but we also need to remember WHO we are addressing and adjust our attitude from one of “do it my way,” to “Lord, YOUR will be done.”

Please see this page for more information. http://www.eliyah.com/names.html


Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Please note that this does NOT apply to any of the images on this site except for the free Psalm images which are marked as free. Most photos are purchased stock photos. It is ILLEGAL for you to take and use them, whether for yourself, commercially or for a non-profit venture such as a church or Bible Study. If you have not bought these photos from the source, the stock photography company has every right to sue you.

How Do You Translate That?

I have a very honest Bible. In the footnotes, it unfailingly tells me when the scholars just cannot agree on the proper translation of a word in the original texts. While the official language of Isra’el is Biblical Hebrew, an understanding of the meaning of certain words has been lost. Plus as manuscripts did not include vowels, some words create a great deal of controversy. Two of them are driving me to screaming point at the moment.

Enslave or Kill?
This one really matters. The controversial Scripture is 2 Samuel 12:31 and I cover the full discussion in this article on Faithwriters. When David and his armies capture the Ammonite city of Rabbah, they then go on to eliminate the Ammonite threat throughout all the cities and towns. Here is what the New Living Translation says: “He also made slaves of the people of Rabbah and forced them to labor with saws, iron picks, and iron axes, and to work in the brick kilns. That is how he dealt with the people of all the Ammonite towns. Then David and all the army returned to Jerusalem.”

You need to read the footnotes to hear the alternative version: “He also brought out the people of Rabbah and put them under saws, iron picks, and iron axes, and he made them pass through the brick kilns.” Yes, that does mean they were killed in horrendous ways, using saws, picks, axes and by being cast into the fires of kilns. The Masoretic Biblical text supports this as the correct version, and under the Biblical laws of the time, that would have been the correct course of action for David to take. However, as this is completely unthinkable to the modern brain, many Bible soften the interpretation and the arguments among scholars rage as people like me scratch their heads and wonder what the?

Simple Details on Gender
2 Samuel 6:23 states that after despising David for praising the Lord, his wife, Michal, remained childless all her life. However, if you take that word to the Hebrew meaning, it is a male word יָ֫לֶד or yeled. If you take the gender of that word literally, she may have had daughters, but was eliminated from the line of succession, which as Daviyd’s first wife, could have placed her male offspring as the first heir.

Does this matter. Well, to me, yes. If the Hebrew word is a known masculine word, why don’t the Bible writers just say sons? Look at how it has affected Michal’s reputation too.

So how do I get around this? Sometimes I just don’t. I can’t. The best way of coping I have found is:

  1. prayer for understanding;
  2. understanding the Scripture on the basis of other clear principles, which are solid as granite; and
  3. grinding my teeth and just having to put up with the fact that some things won’t be known until I get to heaven.

It’s not a perfect answer, but it has taught me one important lesson: keep an open mind as to what Scripture means. I have been tempted to write David off as an awful person a few times. Why? Because I was swayed by the word slavery and concept of torture. I hadn’t yet studied Deuteronomy and Leviticus, which tell me why he did what he did… and how he was right.

Many answers are there, if we are willing to let our modern thinking and biases sit quietly for a time, while we find the guiding Scriptures.


Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Please note that this does NOT apply to any of the images on this site except for the free Psalm images which are marked as free. Most photos are purchased stock photos. It is ILLEGAL for you to take and use them, whether for yourself, commercially or for a non-profit venture such as a church or Bible Study. If you have not bought these photos from the source, the stock photography company has every right to sue you.